Recipe design & software to be grocer’s new secret sauce?

Recipe design

Recipe design & software to be grocer’s new secret sauce? 3D printing might bring tech world business model elements to grocery stores, such as software-as-a-service or SaaS. SaaS sells or licenses and delivers software to the user on demand rather than as a product in a box. In the future, grocery stores might compete on how their chefs, or store’s ‘food designers’, produce the best meal programs available only on that store’s website for single downloads and only using that store’s supplies.  Continue reading “Recipe design & software to be grocer’s new secret sauce?”

3D printing has evolved from a novelty item to a viable in-store tool

3D printing is being used across a range of industries, from construction to medical technology. Its use in the food industry continues to grow, allowing for customization across a number of categories. 3D printing of confectionery has focused primarily on chocolate and hard sugar candy, tut recent innovations have led to printing of gummy candy. In the US, retailer Dylan’s Candy Bar is offering in-store 3D printing, providing consumers with over 100 designs for candy that can be made in five minutes.

3D printing moves from hard candy to gummies Continue reading “3D printing has evolved from a novelty item to a viable in-store tool”

3D Food Printing Will Bring Complete Realignment of the Supply Chain

Numerous sectors are experimenting with 3D printing, which has the potential to disrupt many markets. One that’s already making progress is the food industry.

The U.S. Army hopes to use 3D printers to customize food for each soldier. NASA is exploring 3D printing of food in space. The technology could eventually even end hunger around the world.

What does that have to do with your supply chain? Quite a bit — because 3D printing does more than just revolutionize the production process. It also requires a complete realignment of the supply chain. Continue reading “3D Food Printing Will Bring Complete Realignment of the Supply Chain”

“Cellulose as an edible ingredient for 3D Printing” – Presented by Sonia Holland, University of Nottingham

Cellulose is the most abundant polymer in nature, providing structure to plant cell walls. It is therefore consumed regularly in the diet, not contributing any calorific value but acting as a natural dietary fiber. Its use as an ingredient, however, is somewhat limited to ‘filler’ type roles or as a bulking agent as good solvents are not suitable for food use. Mechanical abrasion by ball milling can render an amorphous powder which, when the recrystallisation kinetics are known, may be utilized in a Binder Jetting 3D process to create edible cellulose-based structures.

About Sonia Holland Continue reading ““Cellulose as an edible ingredient for 3D Printing” – Presented by Sonia Holland, University of Nottingham”

“Study and characterization of food matrices intended for 3D printing” – Presented by Danilo Spiga, Sardegna Ricerche

The presentation will be about six month testing several edible materials produced in the Sardinian’s companies with the 3d printing machine, to check the future potentialities of this technology with their product and, eventually, how the 3d printing techniques can improve their current production line setup. The companies that offered their product and hosted our extrusion tests, were from different food sectors such as: Pasta, Cheese, Turròn, Ice cream, Bakeries companies and some Chef. The last project’s part has been focused in the laboratory analysis of the printed product. Continue reading ““Study and characterization of food matrices intended for 3D printing” – Presented by Danilo Spiga, Sardegna Ricerche”

“3D Printing for Future Food Security” – Presented by Michael Petch, Black Dog Consulting

The IMF has established a direct link between food insecurity and social unrest, including events such as riots, civil war and revolution. This presentation will look at how 3D printing can be used to address the four pillars of food security: Availability, Access, Utilization and Stability. Long-term macro trends suggest even greater demands will be placed upon already precarious regional food resources and therefore enhancing resilience must be considered a priority task. 3D printing solutions and opportunities will be proposed and assessed.

About Michael Petch Continue reading ““3D Printing for Future Food Security” – Presented by Michael Petch, Black Dog Consulting”