3D Food Printing Conference welcomes Labiotech.eu as Media Partner

labiotech.eu

Labiotech.eu is media partner of 3D Food Printing Conference 2020

Labiotech.eu is the leading digital media covering the European biotech industry. Over 150,000 monthly visitors use it to keep an eye on the business and innovations in biotechnology. The company’s mission is to build the “Next Generation of Digital Media for Biotech”.

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Mona Lisa, world’s first personalized 3D printed chocolate brand

mona lisa

Mona Lisa, the global decoration brand of The Barry Callebaut Group is the first brand to launch personalized 3D printed chocolate at scale, made from Belgian chocolate. The move revolutionizes the world of chocolate craft by combining industry-leading production technology, bespoke design and Barry Callebaut’s chocolate expertise – allowing chefs to craft their own unique creations and reproduce them rapidly and affordably, no matter how intricate or specific the design.

Through the new Mona Lisa 3D Studio, chefs now have a world of new creative tools at their disposal. For the launch event, Mona Lisa teamed up with Jordi Roca – one of the world’s most creative pastry chefs – to help him unleash his creativity through a unique 3D piece made out of chocolate. His latest creation ‘Flor de Cacao’ represents a cocoa bean that opens up like a cacao flower through contact with hot chocolate sauce.

This new way of working with chocolate is going to take consumers by surprise, with previously unthinkable shapes produced at scale and with impressive precision. I’m usually inspired by the things I can’t do as they represent a creative challenge – but now, thanks to Mona Lisa 3D Studio, I can take my chocolate craftsmanship to the next level. I can imagine any new kind of design and it will come to life.

Pioneering on the chocolate market
Innovation is an important pillar of Barry Callebaut’s proven ‘smart growth’ strategy. I am delighted that the Mona Lisa 3D Studio allows chefs to create unique consumer experiences at scale. This technological breakthrough innovation positions the Mona Lisa brand at the forefront of the industry and strengthens Barry Callebaut’s global leadership in Decorations.

The Mona Lisa 3D Studio is equipped with innovative precision technology capable of printing thousands of pieces at a time while retaining a bespoke hand-made appearance. Chefs and customers can personalize a chocolate decoration with their own unique design, shape and size preferences, before a team of designers transform the product into a digital 3D prototype with samples. Once the prototype is approved, the final product can be quickly reproduced at scale. The creations can be used for desserts, confectionery, hot drinks and pastries. This service will be first available to chefs and hotels, coffee chains and restaurant establishments in specific European countries. The first customer of the Mona Lisa 3D Studio is Van der Valk, a leading hotel chain in the Netherlands.

Empowering brands and chefs to stay ahead of trends with unseen chocolate creations

Millennials and centennials want to celebrate life with new experiences and stories. In this context, food aesthetics are increasingly important. A recent Barry Callebaut research study showed that 70% of consumers want to try new and exciting chocolate experiences – and 6 out of 10 want to share it on social media. 3D printing is addressing consumer desires by pushing the boundaries of what’s possible aesthetically. With the new technology, chefs can develop unseen and unique creations and expand their craftsmanship while working with Belgian chocolate.

3D food printing as a tool for flavour release modelling

Marco Morgenstern

by Marco Morgenstern, New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research

3D food printing offers potential for building a variety of food structures in a highly controlled way. Multiple materials with different consistency, flavour or colour can be included and distributed accurately in a food sample.

Texture and flavour perception of food is largely determined by physical processes in the mouth during eating. The way structures in the food are broken down depends on physiological factors, such as saliva secretion or dental status, but also on the mechanical properties of the food. Models exist to describe this breakdown and predict particle size distributions and flavour release during mastication.

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The future of 3D printed food & pharma is interconnected

3d printed

3D Printing techniques are creating great opportunities not only for personalised pharmaceuticals, but also for personalised food & nutrition. The texture of the food can be adapted so it can help people with swallowing problems, while the composition of the 3D printed food can be adapted to the specific necessities of the person: vitamins or antibiotics can be added, for instance.

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Scaling up customised production with 3D Food Printing and standard fillings in the Food Service Market

nina hoff

Duo presentation: Nina Hoff, CEO & Co-Founder, byFlow & Jeroen van der Graaf, Creative Innovation Manager, Verstegen Spices & Sauces

byFlow is a leading 3D Food Printing company, and will present a short term solution to scale up customised/personalised production

program: https://agrifoodinnovationevent.com/program/

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Possibilities and limitations of 3D-Printing chocolate

Benedikt Daschner

by Benedikt Daschner, chocolate³

In this presentation you will have the chance to take a closer look at chocolate printing. Starting withe the idea behind it you will be presented with the answer to the following questions: What’s currently possible? How did we get there? Where will this be going? What makes our approach different? Why is chocolate the “perfect” media for food printing?

Program: https://agrifoodinnovationevent.com/program/

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3D printing the world’s first plant-based beefsteak

Giuseppe Scionti

by Giuseppe Scionti, Founder & CEO, NOVAMEAT

NOVAMEAT developed a unique technology that allows producing plant-based meat substitutes able to mimic the texture, taste, appearance and nutritional properties of animal meat products, using only natural ingredients of non-animal origin, and a customized 3D printer.

This new invention combines tissue engineering and state-of-the-art knowledge in bioprinting with modern gastronomic strategies, creating a unique technology able to generate foods with high protein content, with the characteristic fibrous consistency of meat, and without the need of using soy or wheat-gluten derived ingredients.

Program: https://agrifoodinnovationevent.com/program/

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Toward viable business cases in 3D food printing

Rob van de Langenberg

by Rob van de Langenberg, HAS Hogeschool

HAS University of applied science, in particular the professorship Design Methods in Food has been researching 3D food printing for over 3 years.

In this presentation the outcome will be presented of the current research, which focusses on building viable 3D food printing business cases. Two business cases are being researched: the first one is using 3D food printing of everyday food for (elderly) people with chewing and swallowing problems, and the second one is a startup enterprise that provides business-to-business services for events and catering.

The research is conducted together with two partner companies: byFlow and De Verspillingsfabriek.

program: https://agrifoodinnovationevent.com/program/

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