Foodies embrace 3D-printed cuisine

Marijn Roovers’ epicurean delights have graced the tables of some of the Netherlands’ finest restaurants. But the food designer’s Chocolate Globe is his most intricate — and technologically advanced — creation. A chocolate shell just 0.8 millimetres thick is embossed in gold with the chocolate’s continent of origin, …
and it holds delicacies that symbolize the region.

Roovers and chef Wouter van Laarhoven printed it — layer-by-layer of chocolate — on a 3D printer. Roovers is at the forefront of a small group of gourmets and technophiles who want to revolutionize how food is prepared. On 21 April, they will gather in the Netherlands for the first conference dedicated to the 3D printing of food.

Later this year, Natural Machines in Barcelona, Spain, will try to bring the technology into household kitchens when it begins selling Foodini, its 3D food printer aimed at consumers.

“There is a big debate in the 3D-printing world: will one day everybody have a 3D printer at home? Is it like a personal computer?” says Hod Lipson, an engineer at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. “I think the answer is yes, but it’s not going to print plastic. It’s going to be a food printer.”

Arts and crafts
Lipson, whose laboratory has been working with 3D printing for decades, says that it was not long before his students began to print frosting and chocolate. Most gourmets who have embraced the technology have focused, like Lipson and Roovers, on artistic and playful confectionery.  … (read more)

Source: Nature.com

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