Laser cooking: re-imagining the culinary experience – Presented by Jonathan Blutinger, Columbia University

Jonathan Blutinger

Laser cooking: re-imagining the culinary experience – Presented by Jonathan Blutinger, Columbia University, at the 3D Food Printing Conference 2019, which takes place during AgriFood Innovation Event, June 26-27, Venlo, The Netherlands.

3D food printers have the ability to combine edible ingredients in new and complex ways, giving rise to tailored nutrition on a per person basis. Now that we can make custom food products, how are we expected to cook them? Jonathan’s ongoing research in laser cooking provides a solution to this problem. Continue reading “Laser cooking: re-imagining the culinary experience – Presented by Jonathan Blutinger, Columbia University”

Coaxial extrusion-based printing for designing foods having personalized properties – Presented by Valerie Vancauwenberghe, MeBios, KU Leuven

Valerie Vancauwenberghe

Coaxial extrusion-based printing for designing foods having personalized properties – Presented by Valerie Vancauwenberghe, PhD, Post-Doc, KU Leuven, MeBioS division, Belgium, on June 28, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, during the Agri-Food Innovation Event 2018 at Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

Low methoxylated pectin gel is a promising food-ink for the 3D printing of healthy candy having variable textural and structural properties. However, the actual printing method based on simple extrusion requires an incubation post-treatment in calcium solution in order to complete the gelation of printed objects. Coaxial printing can avoid the need of post-treatment by accurately controlling the gelation of printed pectin objects through the simultaneous deposition of pectin ink and crosslink solution.

Coaxial extrusion-based printing can be applied for more food products than pectin gels and thus, could innovate and bring more possibilities in the personalization of printed foods. Continue reading “Coaxial extrusion-based printing for designing foods having personalized properties – Presented by Valerie Vancauwenberghe, MeBios, KU Leuven”

Powderbased 3D food printing technologies – Presented by Martijn Noort, Wageningen Food & Biobased Research

Martijn Noort

Powderbased 3D food printing technologies – Presented by Martijn Noort, Wageningen Food & Biobased Research at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

Besides FDM/extrusion printing also powder based techniques such as Powder Bed Printing (PBP) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) offer potential for food production. Main advantages of powderbased printing are the higher degrees of 3D design freedom and scalability. Furthermore, these techniques offer unique potential to control the local composition as well as the physical state of the food product structure on a voxel base. This presentation gives an overview of the current state of the art of powder based food printing technologies and their added value over conventional food manufacturing.

Continue reading “Powderbased 3D food printing technologies – Presented by Martijn Noort, Wageningen Food & Biobased Research”

3D printing for personalised nutrition – Presented by Stephen Homer, CSIRO

Stephen Homer

3D printing for personalised nutrition – Presented by Stephen Homer, CSIRO, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

In recent years, people have become far more aware of their nutritional requirements and there is a greater interest in eating healthy and convenient foods. 3D printing offers the potential to prepare convenient and on-demand personalised foods to cater for a variety of consumer segments and lifestyles. This presentation will outline the objectives of our research program and discuss methods for 3D printing with some focus on gelation mechanisms as well as methods to control micro-structures to regulate digestion.

Continue reading “3D printing for personalised nutrition – Presented by Stephen Homer, CSIRO”

3D food printing @ HAS Hogeschool – Presented by Antien Zuidberg, HAS Hogeschool

Antien Zuidberg

3D food printing @ HAS Hogeschool – Presented by Antien Zuidberg, HAS Hogeschool, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

Lector A.Zuidberg will shortly introduce HAS hogeschool and the lectorate Design Methods in Food. 3 groups of students will shortly pitch their bachelor project, which will also be presented separately in stand 11.

Interview 
What drives you?
Design methods in Food Innovations

What are the three things you would take with you on a deserted island?
A book, paper and pencils

What emerging technologies/trends do you see as having the greatest potential in the short and long run?
Personalised food , 3d food printing and Design Methods Continue reading “3D food printing @ HAS Hogeschool – Presented by Antien Zuidberg, HAS Hogeschool”

The psychology around 3D food printing: acceptance and perception – Presented by Patricia Bulsing, The Hague University of Applied Sciences

Patricia Bulsing

The psychology around 3D food printing: acceptance and perception – Presented by Patricia Bulsing, The Hague University of Applied Sciences, Nutrition and Dietetics bachelor degree programme , at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

Knowledge around the technology of food printing is increasing and more and more applications of the technique are being identified. However, the success of a device not only relies on technology, but also on how the end user perceives this technology.

In this presentation we take a look at the acceptance of new technology in general and how 3D food printing is perceived by potential consumers. A qualitative study will be reported whereby acceptance towards food printing is investigated. In addition, a use case, with steps leading to application of this new technology in a relevant setting, will be presented. Continue reading “The psychology around 3D food printing: acceptance and perception – Presented by Patricia Bulsing, The Hague University of Applied Sciences”

3D printing of porous food structures contain Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 – Presented by Lu Zhang, Laboratory of Food Process Engineering, Wageningen University

Lu Zhang

3D printing of porous food structures contain Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 – Presented by Lu Zhang, Laboratory of Food Process Engineering, Wageningen University, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

Extrusion-based 3D printing offers more flexibility in achieving food structures with controlled composition, geometric complexity and added functionality compared to conventional manufacturing methods. This study investigates the feasibility of 3D printing of wheat flour dough containing probiotics (i.e., Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1) and the survival of probiotic bacteria during post-processing (i.e., baking) as influenced by the geometric design of the structure and the baking condition. From our previous studies we hypothesized that baked products with higher surface/volume ratios would lead to increased survival of bacteria after baking. The printability of different dough formulations was evaluated by two characteristics: easy and uniformity of extrusion; precision and accuracy of the printing. Designs were created to make highly-porous and filled baked food structures. Results show that the precision and stability of the printed structure was the best when using wheat flour with lower protein content (7.2 % w/w), when using a nozzle diameter of 1.2 mm and by adding calcium caseinate (3 % w/w of flour) to weaken the gluten network. The baking process at 175 ○C did not affect the appearance of the printed structures and thus survival of probiotic bacteria was determined. The residual viability of probiotics in a ‘honeycomb’ structure was 1-log higher than that in a ‘concentric’ structure, when 98 % degree of starch gelatinization was reached. This result is consistent with our hypothesis that the bacteria survived better in a structure with higher surface/volume ratio. This work may offer a new avenue to the development of innovative solid food products containing probiotic bacteria. Continue reading “3D printing of porous food structures contain Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 – Presented by Lu Zhang, Laboratory of Food Process Engineering, Wageningen University”

3D food printing @ TNO: latest developments – Presented by Kjeld van Bommel, TNO

Kjeld Van Bommel

3D food printing @ TNO: latest developments – Presented by Kjeld van Bommel, TNO, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

TNO has been active in the area of 3D Food Printing since 2011. Based on its combined knowledge and expertise on 3D printing as well as food, TNO has been able to help 3D food printing develop into an exciting new field. 3D food printing innovations at TNO have been made both in the materials and formulations space as well as in the area of processes and equipment. The presentation will focus on some of the latest results obtained using the various 3D printing technologies under investigation at TNO. Continue reading “3D food printing @ TNO: latest developments – Presented by Kjeld van Bommel, TNO”

Exploration of 3D food printing and its application for tailored military rations – Presented by Mary Scerra, US Army Natick Soldier Research

Mary Scerra

Exploration of 3D food printing and its application for tailored military rations – Presented by Mary Scerra, US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus, Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands.

3D printing technology for food continues to advance. This technology uniquely offers customizability, which is as yet an unexploited advantage for fulfilling an individual’s preferences or specific nutritional needs. The potential relevance of this technology for application to military field feeding is currently being investigated.

Consumer judgements of the sensory characteristics and concept acceptability of 3D printed food were recently measured, showing both high approval of the product and general acceptance of the technology. While food, with its complex and varied composition and rheological behavior, is a relatively challenging media to 3D print, we have demonstrated that systematically modifying the material properties of the matrices aids in their printability.

Application of this technology to military field feeding could in the future provide highly tailored ration components that meet the Warfighter’s real-time nutritional needs and preferences. Furthermore, placement of 3D printers on or near the battlefield could be logistically beneficial by reducing reliance on typical thermostabilized ration components, which have a mandated 3 year shelf life, and in which quality can degrade over time. PAO# U18-146 Continue reading “Exploration of 3D food printing and its application for tailored military rations – Presented by Mary Scerra, US Army Natick Soldier Research”

The food Printing Manifesto – Presented by Eshchar Ben Shitrit, Jet-Eat

Eshchar Ben Shitrit

The food Printing Manifesto – Presented by Eshchar Ben Shitrit, Jet-Eat, at the 3D Food Printing Conference, Jun 28, Brightlands Campus , Villa Flora, Venlo, The Netherlands. Read the interview

How will the coming decades shape the future of food printing? What does it take for food printing to go from gimmick to a game-changing technology, with a real global impact? The Food Printing Manifesto is a unique attempt to question the fundamental assumptions of 3D food printing and lay the ground for a new field – food printing. Continue reading “The food Printing Manifesto – Presented by Eshchar Ben Shitrit, Jet-Eat”