Material research of printable plant based proteins has greatest future potential – Eshchar Ben Shitrit, Jet-Eat

plant based proteins

Material research of printable plant based proteins has greatest future potential – Eshchar Ben Shitrit, Jet-Eat

Eshchar Ben Shitrit is CEO & Co-Founder of Jet-Eat, Israel. Eshchar is a technology strategist by day and foodie by night. After working on digital printing for HP Indigo and digital finishing + 3D modeling at Highcon system, he started pursuing his life long dream – making food printing possible. Combining passion for innovation and obsession with food, Jet-eat aims to transform the way that people prepare, experience and share food. Coming from the birthplace of digital printing, and the emerging hub of for foodtech – Israel is set to be the place where true food printing can come from. On June 28, Eshchar Ben Shitrit will speak about The food Printing Manifesto at the 3D Food Printing Conference 2018 in Venlo, The Netherlands.
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3d food becomes more and more an experience… – Interview with Nina Hoff, byFlow

Nina Hoff

3d food becomes more and more an experience… – Interview with Nina Hoff, byFlow

byFlow is a Dutch manufacturer of innovative 3D printers. The Focus of byFlow is the world’s first foldable 3Dprinter with fast exchanging printerheads to print a very wide range of printer materials.  This way it becomes possible in the future to print multilayered foods. Chocolate from multinational Barry Callebaut is used by byFlow to make foodprinting easier. Chocolate is a real challenge as it has many properties that have to be handled.  Nina Hoff is since 2010 involved in 3D printing via her dad and brother, the last one developed the initial idea out of frustration while developing 3D printers for food. Nina will speak about how 3D printing hacks the way we eat our dinner on June 28 during the 3D Food Printing Conference in Venlo.

“3D food printing is becoming quickly an experience people are looking forward to. 3D food printing has come a long way and still has much development ahead, but in a few years’ time it will become a household activity,” says Nina Hoff, Managing Director byFlow in Eindhoven. “Speed is an important hurdle for us, but has very much to do with the properties of the materials used for printing. Chocolate was our first basic material and proved to be rather difficult, but in the end we have mastered it.”

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Faster 3D food printing will reach the consumer – Interview with Nesli Sözer, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Nesli Sozer

Faster 3D food printing will reach the consumer – Interview with Nesli Sözer, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Dr. Nesli Sözer is a Principal Investigator at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. and works on the refinement of ingredients and structures of 3D printed food. She will give a speech on this subject and the latest developments in the field during the 3D Food Printing Conference, on June 28, 2017, in Venlo, The Netherlands.

“At the moment the fact that 3D food printing is not generally known to the greater public has to do with challenges associated with ingredient mix rheology (study of flow of mass), shape and structure accuracy, material memory, compatibility with traditional food processing technologies and the low printing speed of 3D printing machines,” according to Dr. Nesli Sözer, “Until now 3D food printing is mostly limited to special designs which require high precision printing. Something you can do with the high end food printers, but is more difficult for the cheaper machines available to the general market. But printing speed is essential to the future acceptance of 3D food printing.” Continue reading “Faster 3D food printing will reach the consumer – Interview with Nesli Sözer, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland”