Personalized vegan foods made using 3D printed high-tech fiber with zero calories

3D printed high-tech fiber

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Yissum Research Development Company have just unveiled a futuristic, extremely impressive breakthrough for 3D printing technologies – personalized foods made using an edible, high-tech fiber with zero calories! This versatile fiber is known as nanocellulose.

According to the President of Yissum and CEO Yaron Daniely, “[t]he idea [of this 3D printed food technology] is to enable full control of the substances used for the purpose of creating healthy and tasty meals that can be eaten immediately. This has the potential to address a variety of challenges facing the field of nutrition.”

Foods such as meat substitutes could be easily printed, as well as producing allergy-friendly alternative products. Ultimately, this is a giant leap toward eliminating animal agriculture from food production altogether without compromising on traditional textures. Continue reading “Personalized vegan foods made using 3D printed high-tech fiber with zero calories”

Chinese researchers investigate lemon juice gel as food material for 3D printing

food material

Chinese researchers investigate lemon juice gel as food material for 3D printing

The aim of this paper is to develop a new 3D printing food constructs based on lemon juice gel system. We investigated the effect of potato starch (10, 12.5, 15, 17.5 and 20 g/100 g) on the rheological properties and mechanical properties of lemon juice gels. Besides, the influence of printing parameters (nozzle height, nozzle diameter, extrusion rate and nozzle movement speed) on the quality of printed products were also studied. The results show that it is suitable to make the size of the nozzle height the same with that of the nozzle diameter, which could not be regarded as a key factor that affects print quality. An equation is proposed to explain the relationship between extrusion rate, nozzle diameter and nozzle movement speed. In this printing system, the 1 mm nozzle diameter, 24 mm3/s extrusion rate and 30 mm/s nozzle movement speed were found to be the optimal parameters to print 3D constructs matching the target geometry with fine resolution, more smooth surface texture, and fewer point defects with no compressed deformation. Continue reading “Chinese researchers investigate lemon juice gel as food material for 3D printing”

3D bioprinting to be tested in agricultural research

agricultural research

3D bioprinting to be tested in agricultural research

Imitating nature in laboratories and manufacturing leaves, seeds, and even more complex structures of plants, animals or microorganisms could soon become a reality at Embrapa Genetic Resources and Biotechnology’s Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology (LNANO), in Brasília, DF, Brazil. The recent approval of a project, as well as other related activities, will enable researchers to test biological activities in three-dimensional environments, that is, closer to reality.

The project leader, the Embrapa researcher Luciano Paolino da Silva explains that the  technique used is called 3D bioprinting, a variant of 3D printing, a method to manufacture solid objects from a digital file containing spatial information and dimensional coordinates. The team intends to use the 3D bioprinting technology to create valid models and to test nanomaterials produced from biomolecules obtained from agricultural and forestry industry waste.  Continue reading “3D bioprinting to be tested in agricultural research”

Shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water, engineered by MIT researchers ( VIDEO)

Shape-shifting noodles

Shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water, engineered by MIT researchers

“Don’t play with your food” is a saying that MIT researchers are taking with a grain or two of salt. The team is finding ways to make the dining experience interactive and fun, with food that can transform its shape when water is added.

The researchers, from MIT’s Tangible Media Group, have concocted something akin to edible origami, in the form of flat sheets of gelatin and starch that, when submerged in water, instantly sprout into three-dimensional structures, including common pasta shapes such as macaroni and rotini.

The edible films can also be engineered to fold into the shape of a flower as well as other unconventional configurations. Playing with the films’ culinary potential, the researchers created flat discs that wrap around beads of caviar, similar to cannoli, as well as spaghetti that spontaneously divides into smaller noodles when dunked in hot broth. Continue reading “Shape-shifting noodles when dunked in water, engineered by MIT researchers ( VIDEO)”

Changing the Structure and Texture of 3D Printed Cheese ( Video)

3D Printed Cheese

Changing the Structure and Texture of 3D Printed Cheese

Researchers from the University Cork College are experimenting with the structure and texture of 3D printed cheese, with intriguing results.

The rise of 3D printed food has allowed culinary-minded people to reshape and reinvent some of their favorite edible arrangements. From pizza to cake, 3D printing is increasingly used for artistic and sustainable purposes.

But how does the printing process affect the chemical and physical makeup of food?

A team of researchers from University College Cork in Ireland decided to take an in-depth look at the impact that 3D printing has on the structure and texture of cheese. Their findings, recently published in the Journal of Food Engineering, show some interesting changes once processed cheese undergoes the extrusion.   Continue reading “Changing the Structure and Texture of 3D Printed Cheese ( Video)”

Cambridge-based company Dovetail uses variety of pre-packaged liquids or raw ingredients to 3D print food (Video)

Cambridge

Cambridge-based company Dovetail uses variety of pre-packaged liquids or raw ingredients to 3D print food

Producing food by printing it, rather than growing it, could be one way to solve the global food problem, some experts believe.

The Cambridge-based company Dovetail is developing 3D food printing that produces “creative” food from a variety of pre-packaged liquids or raw ingredients.

The printer – costing about the same as a “high-end food mixer”, according to the company – can print food, on demand, at the touch of a smartphone.

Continue reading “Cambridge-based company Dovetail uses variety of pre-packaged liquids or raw ingredients to 3D print food (Video)”

Customised snacks through 3D food printing, developed by Finnish VTT

Finnish VTT

Customised snacks through 3D food printing, developed by Finnish VTT

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd aims to develop advanced food manufacturing technologies by combining expertise in food, material science and 3D printing technology. Healthy snacks with great textures are in increasing demand among consumers. Researchers have the long-term vision of developing high-tech vending machines that provide customised purchases.

Today’s consumer expects healthy, nutritious food with added elements such as design, pleasure and even playfulness. Self-production would enable customisation in addition to these. 3D printing technology offers new opportunities to realise such expectations. Continue reading “Customised snacks through 3D food printing, developed by Finnish VTT”

Dutch 3D printer add-on ColorPod can now 3D print full color edible candies

3D printer

Earlier this year we covered a particularly novel 3D printer add-on called ColorPod. Developed by Netherlands-based Aad van der Geest, ColorPod is a useful add-on to any RepRap style of 3D printer that allows it to print in full color using a combination of powder-based 3D printing and more traditional color inkjet cartridges. Now, as we’ve just learnt, the developers of ColorPod have further updated their technology so that it can actually 3D print full color edibles! Continue reading “Dutch 3D printer add-on ColorPod can now 3D print full color edible candies”

Tikcit is registration platform partner of 3D Food Printing Conference

tikcit

Tikcit is registration platform partner of 3D Printing Design & Engineering conference, wich took place On April 12th, 2016, at Villa Flora in Venlo, The Netherlands.

About Tikcit
Organising an event implies many issues, from ticketing to e-payments, from statistics to ordering supplies, from surveys to social media and many many more. Tikcit is the platform to support you. Continue reading “Tikcit is registration platform partner of 3D Food Printing Conference”